Raleigh, NC Veterans Memorial

All around the United States, events will take place to honor the brave soldiers who put their lives on the line in defense of our nations and rights. Many events surrounding our national memorials are gearing up to celebrate these brave individuals.  A short drive from Carrot-Top Industries, in downtown Raleigh, North Carolina, a Veteran Monument honoring heroes of the World War I and II as well as the Korean War is erected.

 

The base of monument highlights battle scenes from all three wars.  Stationed atop the monument is Lady Liberty embodying peace and victory around the nation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bronze Veterans Statues, Raleigh, NC

Within the memorial area, life-sized bronze statues replicate the harsh reality many soldiers faced every waking day.  From the details of the uniforms, the weaponry of that era as well as the heroic deeds achieved by one of the central statues of two men carrying a wounded soldier, it is a firm reminder of how lucky the nation is to have these brave souls.

 

 

Take the time to visit Raleigh, North Carolina and be sure to go take a look for yourself because no photo can show the true beauty of the memorial.

 

 

 

 

 

Tomb of the Unknowns

 

Another memorial to check out rests in Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia.  The Tomb of the Unknowns frequently referred to as the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, is a monument constructed by soldier turned architect named Lorimer Rich in 1921 dedicated to the members of the U.S. Armed Forces who died while serving but who’s remains were never identified.

 

Below the below the large marble monument, the remains of a WWI unknown is buried.  The unknown is a recipient of a Medal of Honor, as well as many of the highest service awards available.

 

 

West of the tome are white marble slabs on the ground, marking the crypts of the unknowns from World War II, Korea, and at one point Vietnam (in 1998 the remains of First Lieutenant Michael Blassie were identified from the Vietnam tomb.)

 

 

Marine Corps War Memorial

 

While you are in the Arlington area, check out the Marine Corps War Memorial, also known as the Iwo Jima Memorial, representing all members of the United States Marine Corps who have died in conflict since 1775. It serves as a reminder of the sacrifice they gave for our Country. Sculptor Felix de Weldon, an Austrian born sculptor who became an American Citizen in 1945, designed the cast bronze memorial based on one of the most iconic photographs of Military history, the Raising of the Flag on Iwo Jima.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnam Women's Memorial 

A little further North you’ll find the Women’s Vietnam Memorial in Washington, D.C.  The Vietnam Women’s Memorial honors the women who served during the Vietnam War.  Glenna Goodacre, a Texas born sculptor, designed the Memorial and dedicated it in 1993 for the women of the Vietnam War. The Memorial shows three women in uniform tending to a wounded soldier in memory of the large numbers of women nurses that served.  There is also a replica of the Vietnam Women’s Memorial on display at the Vietnam in New Mexico, which was the first large scale Vietnam Memorial in the United States and remains the only state park in the United States dedicated solely to Vietnam Veterans.

 

An amazing fact you may not know about this memorial is that the location and date of every Major Marine Corps engagement up to now is inscribed into the base of the Memorial, honoring all of those who have served, not only our past Veterans. In November of 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower dedicated the memorial in honor of the 179th anniversary of the United States Marine Corps. During his time in office, President John F. Kennedy issued a proclamation that the American Flag would fly on the top of the memorial twenty-four hours a day, which is very uncommon for traditional U.S. Flag flying regulations.

 

 

 

Korean War Veteran Statue

 

Continuing with memorials in historic D.C. another great spot is the Korean War Veterans Memorial.  Sculpted from solid granite, the memorial features more than 2,500 photographic images sandblasted into the wall depicting soldiers, supporters and the land the conflict took place on. Centered within the wall of the memorial are nineteen statues standing tall at over seven inches tall, each constructed of stainless steel representing troops on patrol from each branch of the Armed Services.  If you’ve never seen this Memorial in person, it is overpowering and truly gives the sense of the conflict and the bravery that took place during it.

 

It wasn’t until 1995 that President Bill Clinton and the President of the Republic of Korea dedicated the memorial to the brave men and women who served in the Korean War conflict. But each member of the United Nations that contributed to the Korean War effort is listed on the United Nations Wall to the North of the grand statues, signifying an honor for troops, but those who also made sacrifices.

 

 

World War II Memorial

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D.C.’s World War II Memorial is located right in the National Mall of the Nation’s capital and stands fifty-six pillars and a set of arches surrounding a beautiful plaza adorned by a gleaming fountain in honor of the sixteen million soldiers who served in WWII, the supporters of the conflict from home as well as the 400,000+ individuals who lost their lives.  This great monument is known as the National WWII Memorial. The Memorial is in the shape of two semi-circles curving around the fountain and standing between the two sets of pillars is the Freedom Wall, which features 4,048 gold dimensional stars around a curve, each of which is representing 100 American soldiers who died in the war.

 

This memorial is fairly new to Washington D.C., opening to the public only a few years ago in 2004. President Bill Clinton signed the law authorizing to have the memorial built, but it was President George W. Bush who dedicated it a few days before Memorial Day.

 

This Veteran’s Day, fly your American flags proudly, thank a Veteran if you know one, and remember the great sacrifices that these memorials were built for. If it wasn’t for them, we wouldn’t have the privilege to even share these stories online with one another.  And be sure to see some of the great Veteran’s Day specials taking place for November 11th.